Care Collective: East Ren

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Stephanie's Story - Caring for Mum (4min)

 

Thank you to the Greater Pollok Carer's Centre for making this great video. 

WILMA: My name's Wilma Forsyth and I work for the Greater Pollok Carer's Centre. I help support young people who are young carers, who care for members of their family that may have a disability, illness mental health issue or drug or alcohol misuse

A young carer sometimes doesn't know they are a young carer. They feel different. Sometimes they may have missed a lot of school and not been able to do homework. They don't have friends out there, feel isolated. They don't want to mix with anyone. What we try and do is, we try to say to young person. It's OK to care. Be proud of what you do, but you might just need that extra bit of support, and this is where we come in.

I'm Stephanie and I'm a full time. I've been a carer for 8 years. I recognised I was a young carer when Wilma came out to see me. I didn't really know if I was one or not. 

STEPHANIE: My Mum's got different illnesses, so I need to care for her about them. I need to help her around the house, go shopping with her. I need to tell her to take her medication sometimes if she forgets and tell her what appointments if she can't remember. I just need to tell her to listen more and that the hospital is good for her and they can help her.

MUM: My day to day life basically I can feel good for a couple of days and then poorly for a week. I really can't tell myself. It's just the way my illnesses go. To take on a lot of responsibility. To be a young carer I think, in my eyes and my children's eyes is to care for a sibling, a Mum or a Dad. They've got the running of the house. They've got to make sure Mum can get in and out of a bath or a shower, make food, clean the house, look after the younger children as well. It's a lot a lot of work. It's a lot of work for an adult, so how do you think a child feels.

STEPHANIE: I think I have to grow up more to know to do stuff if anyone needs help. I think I'm more like a mum to them. 

MUM: It's something that I have to live with and I have lived with. I try not to let any of my illnesses get me down. You've got to stay positive all the time with having young children. They've got me and I've got them.

MUM: What do you want to do Stephanie?

STEPHANIE: Social Worker. Same as what I am now. 

STEPHANIE: If I can't say anything to my Mum incase it worries her more I just talk to Wilma more about it 'cos she can help me through it.

 

 

 

 

 
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